My Thoughts on Mold Filtering

Mold, mildew, and moisture problems are especially prevalent in states with hot, humid summers, such as Tennessee, Alabama, and Kentucky. Mold also presents a problem in the winter months under just-right conditions.

According to the EPA, our indoor environment is two to five times more toxic than our outdoor environment. In fact, in some cases the air measurements indoors have been found to be 100 times more polluted. One of the most insidious problems that can affect your home’s indoor air quality is mold. 

Mold can grow undetected for months, even years, in areas high in moisture including:

  • Bathrooms
  • Kitchens
  • Basements
  • Crawlspaces

Leaks in ceilingswalls, and plumbing systems are ideal areas for mold to grow and proliferate. Mold can also develop in your HVAC system, which is one of the worst places for it to appear. Prevent most related negative conditions in your property by contracting the professional maintenance services from Massachusetts roofing and siding.

Mold and mold spores in the air can cause serious respiratory health effects including asthma exacerbation as well as coughingwheezing, and upper respiratory symptoms in healthy individuals. The health effects of mold exposure are highly dependent on the type and amount of mold present in the home.

Mold & Mildew in the Home

What is mold? Mold is a fungus and a common component of household dust. In large quantities, it can present a significant health hazard, causing asthma and allergy attics, respiratory problems, and in some cases neurological problems and even death.

What does mold look like? Mold can be distinguished from mildew by its appearance. Mold color varies in shades of black, blue, red, and green. The texture is most often slimy or fuzzy.

What is mildew? Mildew is also a type of fungus. It usually grows flat on surfaces. The term is often used to refer to any type of mold growth.

What does mildew look like? Mildew starts off as a downy or powdery white and often appears on organic materials, such as wood, paper, leather, textiles, walls and ceilings. It can turn to shades of yellow, brown, and black in its later stages.

Both mold and mildew produce distinct offensive odors, and both have been identified as the cause of certain human ailments.

Ideal Conditions for Mold & Mildew

High heat (between 77 and 87 degrees), humidity (between 62 and 93 percent), and a food source (organic material) create the ideal environment for mold and mildew to thrive. That’s why June-August promote mold growth more than any other months. Warm temperatures and high humidity set the stage for mold and mildew.

There are a variety of molds found in the home including Alternaria, Aspergillus, Chaetomium, Cladosporium, Fusarium and many more. The toxic black mold associated with “sick house syndrome” is probably Stachybortrys chartarum. Click here for a list of common household mold types. Regardless of the mold type you have, it is important to remove it from any living spaces, including offices, and garages.

The good news is that there are a variety of ways to fight mold – or to keep it from developing in your home entirely. We’ve compiled a list of easy, proactive methods for keeping your home dry and your air free of mold and other airborne toxins.

Common Sources of Mold & Mildew

  • HVAC ductwork
  • under sinks and around tubs and faucets in bathroom and kitchen
  • in or around HVAC systems, dishwashers, clothes washers, and refrigerators
  • any area high in moisture

Posted by SQLJason

5 comments

Thanks Jason! Any updates on when this will be available? I gave 3 votes 🙂

A desperately needed feature!

Looks like as of Dec’17 of 3 items you’ve suggested 2 are done (highlighting and drill down cross-filtering) and 1 is pending “ability to hold selections on more than one chart for cross-filtering” .
I’m eagerly waiting for the hold selections feature to be implemented as well. That should get it Power BI as a whole very close to being perfect for majority of the analysis scenarios.

Is highlighting been done? New to pbi and been trying all ways and searches still could figure out how to highlighting a particular point in the scatter (or bubble) by selection or a cross-filtering…

Highlighting (As well as most of the features discussed here) are done. However, you can add highlighting to only those charts that have an area, so will not work on bubble charts. But it will work on other charts like bar charts, column charts, pie charts, treeemaps, etc.

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