Tips for Grooming Long-Haired Cats

Tips for Grooming Long-Haired Cats

Tips for Grooming Long-Haired Cats

Grooming cats can be a daunting task, but dealing with long-haired cats can be even more challenging. In this post, our Dallas veterinarians offer some tips on grooming long-haired cats to help the process go as smoothly as possible.

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Grooming Long-Haired Cats

Grooming cats can be quite a challenge, especially when they don’t necessarily enjoy it. And long-haired cats require extra attention during the grooming process, making it even trickier.

If possible, you should brush your cat every day to help prevent matted fur and knots. Whether you are able to do so or not, our veterinary team would like to share some insight on grooming long-haired cats to keep them looking clean and tidy.

How to Groom a Cat With Long Hair

If you want to make grooming your cat’s long fur easier while minimizing discomfort, you can do a few things. Follow these tips to keep your cat looking and feeling their best:

  • A wide-toothed brush can help make brushing easier.
  • Use trimmers or a special mat removal brush to help clear away any matted fur.
  • Once the knots are out, a fine tooth comb can help to brush and soften your cat’s fur.
  • The final brushing should happen with a glove or soft brush.
  • Haircuts can help to keep your cat’s fur manageable.
  • Use products specifically made for grooming long-haired cats.
  • Be sure to keep a regular grooming routine.
  • Bathe your cat when necessary to clear away dirt and debris.

Professional Cat Groomers at North Tollway Pet Hospital

When you bring your cat in for a professional grooming visit, our team will do a thorough job to ensure your pet is looking their best. Here are a few ways your groomer will get your cat freshened up:

  1. The groomer will trim your cat’s nails and, if necessary, shave the area around your cat’s bottom.
  2. The next step will be to bathe your cat and wash away any dirt and debris. Shampooing your cat twice will ensure that your cat has been adequately cleaned. This is the best way for getting vitamin d in dogs diets.
  3. The groomer will wrap your cat up in a towel and clean their eyes and ears.
  4. They will then dry your cat, clearing away any loose fur and allowing them to check for skin concerns quickly.
  5. At this stage, the groomer will brush, trim, comb, use de-shedding tools, and give your cat a haircut if needed.

Regularly taking your cat to the groomer can ensure their fur stays clean and prevents uncomfortable mats and tangles. It also provides an opportunity to monitor their health, as many conditions and illnesses can affect the skin, fur, and other parts of the body.

Grooming Tools for Long-Haired Cats

When giving your long-haired cat a haircut, it always helps to have the right equipment. Several tools can help to make grooming your long-haired cat easier. These tools include:

  • Nail Clippers
  • Stainless Steel Combs
  • Brushes
  • De-Shedding Tool
  • Mat Remover

Posted by SQLJason

31 comments

Technique does not seem to be working when file converted to Excel 2013.

Check out this post – http://www.sqljason.com/2012/11/changing-pivottable-names-in-excel-2013.html
You must be using the Excel Preview version like me, and looks like it doesn't handle the FORMAT function inside the measure.

@png,

Which part is giving you problems? I just recreated it in 2013 and it works fine as far as I can see.

Used this technique on a PowerPivot table with < 200 rows (but a lot of columns). Included 17 measures in the SWITCH function. When added to a slicer, one selection worked fine but with a multiple selection, it choked on my 32-bit system. Apparently, the memory requirements for this are very high.

Kevin Burrus

Does anyone know if there is an alternative if using PowerPivot 2008R2? The switch command does not seem to be available. We are currently stuck on PowerPivot 2008R2 until we can get SharePoint updated. I would appreciate thoughts- If I get an answer I'll loop everyone in!

Kevin Burrus

Looks like I just answered my own question. I have the case where I only need to have one measure or the other, without having to worry about 2 concurrent selections. This works for me:

IF (Min ( Msr[MsrId] ) = 1,Sum ( Fct[Sales] ),IF(Min ( Msr[MsrId] ) = 2,Sum ( Fct[Quantity] ),Sum ( Fct[Profit] )))

Peter Wickwire

I am extremely interested in using this technique to help make dashboards able to display a number of different measures in Fixed amount of space. I have done my best to use your code to create a "slicer driven" measure selection in a model that contains a number of measures all displaying different calculations of web site "hits" (I use the term Impressions.

My disconnected measure table is called MSR — here's what it contains:
Measures Msrid
Available Imps 1
Billable Imps 2
CPM 3
Direct Sold Imps 1P DFP 4
Direct Sold Imps 3P 5
House Imps 1P DFP 6
Ordered Imps 7
Remnant Imps 1P DFP 8
Remnant Imps 3P 9
Reported Imps 3P 10
Stated Imps 1P 11
Billable Imps Prv Period 12
Billable Imps Same Prd Prev Yr 13

Here is the code for my calculated measure: Note that I am simply reusing measures that I've created already instead of re-writing each measure calculated measure in the formula.

=Switch (TRUE,
Min( Msr[Msrid] )=1,
[Available Imps],
Min( Msr[Msrid] )=2,
[Billable Imps],
Min( Msr[Msrid] )=3,
[CPM],
Min( Msr[Msrid] )=4,
[Direct Sold Imps 1P DFP],
Min( Msr[Msrid] )=5,
[Direct Sold Imps 3P],
Min( Msr[Msrid] )=6,
[House Imps 1P DFP],
Min( Msr[Msrid] )=7,
[Ordered Imps],
Min( Msr[Msrid] )=8,
[Remnant Imps 1P DFP],
Min( Msr[Msrid] )=9,
[Remnant Imps 3P],
Min( Msr[Msrid] )=10,
[Reported Imps 3P],
Min( Msr[Msrid] )=11,
[Stated Imps 1P],
Min( Msr[Msrid] )=12,
[Billable Imps Prv Period],
Min( Msr[Msrid] )=13,
[Billable Imps Same Prd Prev Yr])

My issue is that the actual numbers displayed by the measures shown using the "selected formula" noted above, is different from what those same measures display when they are used independently. Worse, the independently placed measures show considerably more data. For example, I have values of the "independent measures for each month of the year. But, the measure values displayed through the selector process only shows 4 or 5 months.

The "measure driven" values are always higher than the independent measures by themselves, but I can't see any other pattern. I have tried two different version of the formula above — one used the calculated measure names themselves. The other used the formulas themselves.

Also, none of the calculations are complex. THey are all simply sums or averages.

Any Suggestions as I REALLY want to use this process.

Peter Wickwire:
prwindenver@gmail.com

Would it be possible to share your powerpivot file to jason143@gmail.com so that I can take a look?

Just wondering if there was a solution for this?

I want to change the measures in the chart not values.

If i use measures to change how the chart is split i can either sum all values related, this first, the last. How can i see all measure categories?

For example. Looking at value by year. Instead, split the values by something like age band, or their first payment method. I’ve solved this before by making a number of bookmarks but means you have to create all the charts first instead of a dynamic solutions.

Thanks so much

This worked great thanks!

One small question is when I use this it doesnt filter other criteria down to those that have values. For example I am showing Gr Hrs by plant, filtered by year from another slicer. When I use the regular measure, it will only show plants that have hours for the given year, but when i use the switch formula, it shows all plants that have ever had hours, with the value being blank.

Any way around this?

James Harper

I get this as well, did anyone find out if it is possible to retain the other slicer filters?

James Harper

I get this as well, did anyone find out if it is possible to retain the other slicer filters?

Hi- i have this same issue as well, in that once the FORMAT() function is applied, i get blank rows. Any work around would be appreciated..

Aware this post is very old but really like this idea. When I implemented it (in Excel 2010) I got everything to work as I wanted, EXCEPT that the FORMAT command you used meant my table returned text values, rather than useable currency/percentage values. As I wanted to chart the outcomes this was no good to me. IS there anything I can tweak to return useable currency/percentage values?

Just thinking out aloud here, can't we use the measure without format function and then format it in the chart directly?

Absolutely could, but wanted to offer user chance to select measure (varying between currency and %) and have the graph scale automatically adjust to either $ or %. Thanks anyway for your response though.

Really appreciate this solution. Like I believe has already been mentioned, I seem to have a issue that when the FORMAT() function is applied, i get BLANK rows that don't show up otherwise. Is there a work around for this?

Thanks again.. you all are way smarter than me with DAX

[…] of this demo, let us use the PowerPivot file that I created in Excel 2010 for my last post – Measure Selection using Slicers in PowerPivot. You can download it from this link. If you open it in Excel 2010, you can see the original table […]

[…] couple of months back, I had written a post on ‘Measure selection using Slicers in PowerPivot’ and this turned out to be one of my most popular ones in the PowerPivot / DAX category. It was […]

Nicholas Osman

Hi,

I am trying to do the same as yourself. However, mine does not want to work with a formatting included.

This one works;

Measure 2:=SWITCH( TRUE,
Min ( Table2[Msrld] ) = 1,
Sum ( NTR_Row_Data[SUMQuantity] ),
Min ( Table2[Msrld] ) = 2,
AVERAGE( NTR_Row_Data[SUMCostOfSale] ),
Min ( Table2[Msrld] ) = 3,
Sum ( NTR_Row_Data[SUMNettValue] ),
Min ( Table2[Msrld] ) = 4,
AVERAGE ( NTR_Row_Data[GM] ))

When l try to format the calculation depending on selection, this generates an error. The formats that l want are;

Measure 2:=SWITCH( TRUE,
Min ( Table2[Msrld] ) = 1,
FORMAT( Sum ( NTR_Row_Data[SUMQuantity] ),”#,#0″),
Min ( Table2[Msrld] ) = 2,
FORMAT( AVERAGE( NTR_Row_Data[SUMCostOfSale] ),”$#,#0″),
Min ( Table2[Msrld] ) = 3,
FORMAT( Sum ( NTR_Row_Data[SUMNettValue] ),”$#,#0″),
Min ( Table2[Msrld] ) = 4,
FORMAT( AVERAGE ( NTR_Row_Data[GM] )”%”))

I have generated the correct format for one of the selections;

Measure 3:=switch (TRUE,
Min ( Table2[Msrld] ) = 1,
FORMAT( Sum ( NTR_Row_Data[SUMQuantity] ),”$#,#0″))

This works but not if there is more that one of them.

Kind regards,

Nicholas Osman

Hi,

I have a measure;

Measure 2:=SWITCH( TRUE,
Min ( Table2[Msrld] ) = 1,
Sum ( NTR_Row_Data[SUMQuantity] ),
Min ( Table2[Msrld] ) = 2,
AVERAGE( NTR_Row_Data[SUMCostOfSale] ),
Min ( Table2[Msrld] ) = 3,
Sum ( NTR_Row_Data[SUMNettValue] ),
Min ( Table2[Msrld] ) = 4,
AVERAGE ( NTR_Row_Data[GM] ))

This works with a slicer selection. The only issue is that the format is incorrect for some of the selections e.g. GM is Gross Margin as a %. The required format is

Measure 2:=SWITCH( TRUE,
Min ( Table2[Msrld] ) = 1,
FORMAT( Sum ( NTR_Row_Data[SUMQuantity] ),”#,#0″),
Min ( Table2[Msrld] ) = 2,
FORMAT( AVERAGE( NTR_Row_Data[SUMCostOfSale] ),”$#,#0″),
Min ( Table2[Msrld] ) = 3,
FORMAT( Sum ( NTR_Row_Data[SUMNettValue] ),”$#,#0″),
Min ( Table2[Msrld] ) = 4,
FORMAT( AVERAGE ( NTR_Row_Data[GM] )”%”))

However this does not work. however, this one below does

Measure 3:=switch (TRUE,
Min ( Table2[Msrld] ) = 1,
FORMAT( Sum ( NTR_Row_Data[SUMQuantity] ),”$#,#0″))

WHAT A LIFE SAVER, thank you for this. I was just about to VBA it all when I found this blog, really grateful.

Forgot to mention a fantastic thing about it. I have loads of measures in Power Pivot. This solution allowed me to “hide from client” my entire sales data including calculated measures, with the only thing elegantly showing in the pivots field list being “Measures” ! 🙂 Thanks again!

Has anyone had any experience doing a similar thing in POWERBI?

The same approach should work. Create a calculated table (or just use the Enter data feature in Power BI) to create a list of the measure names. And then use the same technique basically.

Excellent Work Buddy.. solution works perfectly.

I realize this is an old post, but this approach worked great for me. One additional question… Is there a way to calculate a variance in your example above. For example, the variance between 2011 and 2012 for both Quantity and Profit in your example above?

Sure, you can make 2 additional rows for Quantity Variance and Profit Variance. Also, make sure you make measures that give you the required variance, and then just add those measures into MsrValue

I tried that, but it results in multiple columns of same data.
My table has a version (act, plan, ly) in a single column going down the rows, and my accounts (Sales Qty, Dollars, Margin) in each column.
So, when I try to calculate a difference for Sales Qty for act vs. plan, I get three columns showing the same data in the Act, Plan, LY columns. I would like this to look a bit cleaner for the users. (I apologize, but I am a beginner at this.)

send me an email to jason143@gmail.com, with some sample data and your measure expression. Also, put a picture on how you want the end result to look. The better the detail, the easier it makes my life and the faster you get a response 🙂

Charles Philpott

Thank you for the solution you’ve posted. It appears to be the gift that keeps on giving even 8 years later. I’ve applied the above technique to switch between reported BPD, GPD, SalesPD, Barrels, Gallon, and Sales. It works great. The challenge I’m having is getting the Pivot detail. When selecting on any of those values, double-clicking on a displays amount/quantity will display all the record detail making up that number. When I do this with the measure, it retrieves just one record with the measure number. Any thoughts on how to work around this? Thanks.

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